Evaluating SharePoint Content Management & ALM Processes

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This two-part blog series focuses on the challenges associated with SharePoint and Team Foundation Server (TFS) 2010. Read the first post below to learn more about a framework that IT teams can use to analyze their current content management and application lifecycle management processes to identify where weaknesses may exist.

This two-part blog series focuses on the challenges associated with SharePoint and Team Foundation Server (TFS) 2010. Read the first post below to learn more about a framework that IT teams can use to analyze their current content management and application lifecycle management processes to identify where weaknesses may exist.

Have you considered using the SharePoint Capability Maturity Model?

SharePoint deployment can be a challenge for implementation teams. One of the major concerns is how organizations address content management and application lifecycle management. Since no “one size fits all” solution exists, organizations must discuss the pros and cons associated with different approaches and identify what the best fit may be, based on specific implementations, the team’s skill set, and available budget.

The SharePoint Capability Maturity Model is a useful way to evaluate your current processes and determine where gaps exist.

Level 1: Initial

– Here, processes are undocumented and constantly changing. In a typical Level 1 SharePoint environment, all implementation work occurs in the production environment. Development work is usually deployed manually to the SharePoint farm file system.

Level 2: Repeatable

– In this level, some processes are repeatable, but process discipline is not rigorous. There is commonly more than one environment that requires discipline around deployment. Processes can be repeated in each environment for deployment, but this can result in excessive effort as applications become more complex.

Level 3: Defined

– At this stage, sets of defined and documented standard processes have been established and improved over time. These establish consistency for process performance across the organization. Source control captures the history of applications.

Level 4: Managed

– Through the use of process metrics, it is possible to control existing processes. A well-defined process usually exists for the entire application release cycle. In addition, change control processes enforce quality across each environment.

Level 5: Optimized

– At this level, the focus is on continuous improvement of process performance through incremental changes and improvements. The deployment process has been streamlined to use automated deployments for Solution Packages. Deployments can be triggered automatically as part of the change control process.

Once process gaps have been identified, potential solutions can be explored, such as Attunity’s RepliWeb for SharePoint (ROSS) product.

Want to learn more about this topic? Download this free Attunity whitepaper, authored by Luke Grindahl, MCTS, MCPD, CSM:  Team Foundation Server 2010 – Deploying Builds to Sharepoint

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