5 Reasons Why FTP & Email Are Poorly Suited for File Transfers

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This five-part series on managed file transfer focuses on key concerns, such as security and efficiency, as well as how managed file transfer solutions can help address these issues. Read the second post below to learn why commonly-used file transfer mechanisms – FTP and email – are less than ideal.

Email and FTP are unsecureThis five-part series on managed file transfer focuses on key concerns, such as security and efficiency, as well as how managed file transfer solutions can help address these issues. Read the second post below to learn why commonly-used file transfer mechanisms – FTP and email – are less than ideal.

Many organizations rely on legacy solutions like FTP and email to transfer files among employees and business partners. However, these approaches don’t meet common security requirements, nor are they solutions that are efficient for IT teams to administer. Consider the following five reasons why FTP and email are the wrong solutions for file transfers:

  1. FTP and email are not secure technologies. Plain FTP has limited means for encrypting information. As a result, data can be accessed easily by digital “eavesdroppers.” In addition, neither FTP nor email supports auditing of file transfers.
  2. To prevent theft of files, IT teams must constantly monitor FTP folders. Files that are placed on FTP servers remain there until they are manually deleted. IT teams must continually scrub shared FTP folders to prevent sensitive data from theft or misuse.
  3. FTP does not provide notifications to file senders or recipients. With FTP, individuals sending files are not notified when file transfers are complete and file recipients cannot confirm the integrity of the files they receive.
  4. FTP is not intuitive for non-technical users. As a result, the IT help desk is deluged with calls for assistance, as well as with managing FTP folders and temporary accounts for external users.
  5. Large files and email systems are a bad combination. Most email gateways are configured to restrict attachment sizes. Even attachments of an acceptable size can put an unnecessary strain on the IT infrastructure. If organizations require email archiving, storing large file attachments can rapidly increase storage requirements.

Tell us your story by commenting below and be sure to visit again next Tuesday when we further explore this topic. In the meantime, learn more by downloading this related Attunity whitepaper: “Managed File Transfer: Securing the Way Organizations Deliver Files”.

Read MFT post 1 of 5: Are the Files You Transfer to Support Business Operations Secure? Part 1 of 5

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